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New paper: Evolved Massive Stars at Low-metallicity I. A Source Catalog for the Small Magellanic Cloud

Evolved Massive Stars at Low-metallicity I. A Source Catalog for the Small Magellanic Cloud Ming Yang, Alceste Z. Bonanos, Bi-Wei Jiang, Jian Gao, Panagiotis Gavras, Grigoris Maravelias, Yi Ren, Shu Wang, Meng-Yao Xue, Frank Tramper, Zoi T. Spetsieri, Ektoras Pouliasis We present a clean, magnitude-limited (IRAC1 or WISE1 ≤ 15.0 mag) multiwavelength source catalog for […]

The B[e] stars conference in Prague

During the last week I was traveling from Ondrejov forth and back to the “The B[e] Phenomenon: Forty Years of Studies”, in Prague (27 June – 1 July 2016). It was a nice conference with many interesting talks, and fruitful discussions. Most importantly, I met some old friends and made new ones! I was fortunate […]

New paper on Magellanic Supergiants – Disk tracing for B[e] supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds

Disk tracing for B[e] supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds G. Maravelias, M. Kraus, A. Aret B[e] supergiants are evolved massive stars with a complex circumstellar environment. A number of important emission features probe the structure and the kinematics of the circumstellar material. In our survey of Magellanic Cloud B[e] supergiants we focus on the [OI] […]

Closest O type stars

Reading the book of F.D. Seward and P.A. Charles, “Exploring the X-ray Universe”, I found out some really massive and luminous O type stars that are close by and can be pointed out easily at the night sky: star distance (kpc) magnitude (V) spectral type ζ Pup 0.44 2.3 O4If δ Ori 0.5 2.2 O9.5II […]

How big a star can be?

It seems that this question has no final answer yet. Although the recent models were claiming that no star bigger than 100-150 solar masses can exist, there is evidence that a star close to 300 solar masses exists in the Large Magellanic Cloud. One star, R136a1 (from the young cluster RMC 136a or R136), is […]